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The Distance Between Lost and Found by Kathryn Holmes

Hallelujah Calhoun has been publicly shamed. The boy she loved, Luke Willis, accused her of something horrible in front of all their friends, and now no one will talk to her. When their youth group goes on a retreat in the Smoky Mountains, Hallelujah purposefully goes out of her way to get some space, and two of her friends follow her into the woods. But since no one knows where they are, they promptly find themselves lost with only a couple of granola bars between them.

A Fireproof Home for the Bride by Amy Scheibe

A genre defying novel, this story’s premise is the spiritual and emotional awakening of 18-year-old Emmy growing up in 1950s Minnesota. Emmy lives on a rural farm in a conservative Lutheran family outside Minneapolis. Her mother is a harsh taskmistress; her father is kind but distant. Emmy’s mother has forced her into an engagement to Ambrose, a stern man 10 years her senior whose family owns the farm next door.

Stormbird by Conn Iggulden

In Conn Iggulden’s first book in the War of the Roses series, England and France’s bitter rivalry comes alive in vivid detail. Young Henry VI has just ascended to his English throne, yet he is known to be weak and ineffectual, relying almost completely upon his two advisers, low-born spymaster Derry Brewer and William de la Pole, the Duke of Suffolk. Derry and William secretly plan to unite the young French royal Margaret D’Anjou and Henry in marriage to quell hostilities, but hotheaded nobles like the Plantagenet Duke of York scheme for more war instead of peace.

Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good by Kathleen Flinn

If only all food memoirs were this funny and truly heartwarming!  An ode to her childhood and her relationship with food, Kathleen Flinn (author of The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry) gives loving and hilarious family memories that ring true to those who’ve grown up appreciating the art of food. In 1960s rural Michigan, her family’s struggles to make ends meet on a farm with five constantly famished children strikes a chord of familiarity with many of her Midwestern readers.

Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

In the thrilling conclusion to the Grisha trilogy, Leigh Bardugo has outdone herself again. We left Alina, the Sun Summoner, in a dark underworld ruled by the Apparats where there is no way she can summon the sun to give herself and those around her the sun’s power.  Yet her people still worship her in her weakened state as a Saint, renowned for her ability to capture the sun’s energy as a holy force. Her best friend Mal concocts a plan to free Alina from her dark prison and strategizes how to free Ravka from the grip of the Darkling.

All Fall Down by Jennifer Weiner

If you've read Jennifer Weiner's books before and are expecting hilarious, witty, easy-breezy reading, then this book will be a surprise. Although still trademarked with her sly wit, reading a novel about an upper class woman spiraling into drug addiction is not for the faint of heart. In many other authors’  hands, this kind of subject matter easily could become preachy or heavy handed, but it truly is neither.

My Name is Resolute by Nancy Turner

Nancy Turner’s latest is a gripping adventure novel following the tumultuous life of a young woman named Resolute Talbot.  At the tender age of 11, Resolute and her sister are snatched from her family’s Jamaican plantation in 1729 by Saracen pirates, never to see their family again. She is forced into indentured servitude by hard-edged Puritans, and finally gains her freedom as a young woman.

Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge

Since she was young, Nyx has always known she was destined to marry the Dark Lord who has enslaved her kingdom. Her father has been preparing her for this match for many years, and while her destiny is marriage, the prophecy states that she will be the one to kill him, if he doesn’t kill her first. Nyx rails against the unfairness of the prophecy, as it was her father who bonded her and not her angelic twin sister to the Dark Lord, and yet her fierce determination will be what is needed to defeat him in the end. Or is the Dark Lord not what he seems?

Just One Day by Gayle Forman

Eighteen year old Allyson is an organized and cautious high school senior on a European summer tour. In London, she meets the enigmatic Willem, a young Shakespearean actor who lives for spontaneous world-traveling. Allyson throws caution to the wind when Willem asks her if she wants to visit Paris with him, for ‘just one day’. This one day transforms Allyson’s young life as she confronts her fears, falls in love, and begins to view the world as a maturing adult instead of a self-restrained adolescent.

Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen

Kate grew up during magical and haunting  summers in Lost Lake, Georgia, with her great aunt Eby. But Kate is now grown, and has recently lost her husband in a tragic biking accident. She decides to move in with her domineering mother-in-law for the sake of her whimsical young daughter Devin.  As they’re clearing out their home to move, Devin discovers an old postcard from Lost Lake.  Shocked by this discovery,  Kate toys with the idea of returning there for one more nostalgic summer before they settle into their new lives.

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