History

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson

While we know the story—a German submarine sunk the large cruise ship Lusitania on May 7, 1915 leaving 1,198 people dead—there are still many questions being asked about it one hundred years later. Did the British Navy know about the submarine and still allow the ship to sail near it unescorted? Were there munitions on board the Lusitania? Why did it take only 18 minutes to sink?

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold in the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

Competitive rowing in 1936 was popular and dominated by upper class, East Coast men. Author Brown gives us a thrilling look at a group of working class students from the University of Washington who were molded into the perfect rowing team and who peaked at just the right time for the 1936 Berlin Olympics. The story of the struggles of the team members coming of age during the Great Depression, the training and tactics needed to win, and the thrill of competing in Berlin are all woven into this exciting account of the triumph of these Americans on the world stage.

797.123 BRO

The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Ada was born with a clubfoot.  Her single mother is ashamed and keeps her inside their cramped apartment at all times. It’s only when her little brother James starts going to school and exploring the neighborhood that Ada learns what happens beyond her walls. When the children of London are evacuated due to the German bombings during WWII, Ada runs away with her brother.  They are placed with a reluctant guardian, Susan, who is suffering with depression. 

Elephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II by Vicki Croke

Englishman Billy Williams landed a job in Burma in 1920 as a “forest man” for a teak company and became enamored with the elephants used by the company to haul logs through remote jungle. Elephant Company is the story of these elephants, their native keepers and Billy’s increasing skill at handling them and fascination with their intelligence and personalities. When Japanese forces invaded Burma in 1942, Billy and the elephants had another job—helping the war effort and saving lives.

The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion & the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

This is the story of the House of Romanov: Tsar Nicolas II of Russia, the wealthiest monarch in the world who ruled over 130 million people; his powerful wife; their friend Rasputin and his influence on them; and their five children. Included throughout are pictures and diary entries of the family, as well as those of the peasants who were just trying to survive.

In the Kingdom of Ice: The Grand and Terrible Polar Voyage of the USS Jeannette by Hampton Sides

On July 8, 1879, George Washington De Long led an expedition that set sail on the USS Jeannette headed for the North Pole. After journeying north of the Bering Strait, they became trapped in ice and the Jeannette sank to the bottom of the Arctic Ocean. Marooned with three open boats, the crew began a long fateful march across the frozen sea to the Siberian coast. A spellbinding tale of heroism and determination in the most unforgiving territory on Earth. 

910.452 SID

The Brewer's Tale: A History of the World According to Beer by William Bostwick

William Bostwick’s compulsively readable book takes us through the history of western civilization through the lens of beer and its brewers. He keeps the focus on the human side of beer, with complete reverence for the process and creative mind behind the beverage. Each section looks at a historical period through a specific type - from saisons, to abbey ales, to IPAs - by examining the social, economic, and political factors that brought about the new brew.

The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion and the Fall of Imperial Russia by Candace Fleming

This is the story of Tsar Nicolas II of Russia, the wealthiest monarch in the world, who ruled over 130 million people. It’s also the story of his powerful wife, their friend Rasputin, and their five children. Included throughout are pictures and diary entries from the family, as well as from the peasants who were struggling to survive. Miss Kelly says. “This is a fascinating history of Imperial Russia, for people who normally would not read a history book.

Under the Egg by Laura Marz Fitzgerald

Theodora Tenpenny’s grandfather Jack was an artist, as well as a security guard at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Upon his death he whispers to Theo to “look under the egg” where he promises she will find a letter and a treasure. The “egg” he mentioned is a painting that he made, which has hung over the fireplace for as long as Theo can remember. Taking the painting down, Theo accidently spills alcohol on it and exposes another painting underneath.

A Nice Little Place on the North Side: Wrigley at 100 by George Will

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist & lifelong Cubs fan George Will celebrates Wrigley Field’s 100th birthday with this wonderful collection of stories, anecdotes and statistics. If you are a Cubs fan, you will enjoy Will’s passion for the Cubs, despite their rocky history. And if you are a Sox fan, you will read about the blown leads and numerous losing seasons with a sense of schadenfreude.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - History