Nonfiction

How to Raise a Wild Child: The Art and Science of Falling in Love with Nature by Scott D. Sampson

“Dr. Scott the Paleontologist” from PBS Kids’ Dinosaur Train has written a great guide for parents, grandparents, teachers, and caregivers to help kids get outdoors! Kids today spend up to ninety percent less time outdoors than their parents did. With all of the emotional and social benefits kids receive from getting out into nature, Dr. Scott emphasizes the importance of our role as adults in getting kids the outdoor time they need. 

The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace: A Brilliant Young Man who Left Newark for the Ivy League by Jeff Hobbs

A fascinating look at the life of Robert Peace, a young black man born to a poor single mother in Newark who worked hard and graduated from Yale with a degree in microbiology. Yet he ends up dead in a drug-related shooting. How could this have happened? The author, Rob’s Yale roommate, offers us a look at the lure of drugs and money even to the smartest in the class. Book discussion groups will find lots to talk about.

Biography PEACE, R. 

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania by Erik Larson

While we know the story—a German submarine sunk the large cruise ship Lusitania on May 7, 1915 leaving 1,198 people dead—there are still many questions being asked about it one hundred years later. Did the British Navy know about the submarine and still allow the ship to sail near it unescorted? Were there munitions on board the Lusitania? Why did it take only 18 minutes to sink?

Yes, And: How Improvisation Reverses "No, But" Thinking and Improves Creativity and Collaboration by Kelly Leonard and Tom Yorton

Chicago’s Second City is known for its amazing improv, quirky takes on current events and for launching the careers of such luminaries as Tina Fey and Stephen Colbert.  But a lesser known aspect of its mission has been its work with teaching creativity and emotional intelligence to corporate clients over the past two decades via improv techniques.  By embracing authenticity and the freedom to fail, they teach how to become a more compelling leader and a more collaborative follower.  But aside from all that serious stuff, this is a fun read, full of interesting anecdotes, artful insights and humor.

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande

A prominent surgeon and journalist takes a clear-eyed look at aging and death. Modern medicine can perform miracles, but it is also only concerned with preserving life rather than dealing with end-of-life issues. Drawing on his own experiences observing and helping terminally ill patients, Gawande offers a timely account of how modern Americans cope with decline and mortality. Rather than simply inform patients about their options or tell them what to do, some doctors are choosing to offer guidance that helps patients make their own decisions regarding treatment options and o

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold in the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

Competitive rowing in 1936 was popular and dominated by upper class, East Coast men. Author Brown gives us a thrilling look at a group of working class students from the University of Washington who were molded into the perfect rowing team and who peaked at just the right time for the 1936 Berlin Olympics. The story of the struggles of the team members coming of age during the Great Depression, the training and tactics needed to win, and the thrill of competing in Berlin are all woven into this exciting account of the triumph of these Americans on the world stage.

797.123 BRO

More Love Less Panic: 7 Lessons I Learned About Life, Love and Parenting After We Adopted Our Son from Ethiopia by Claude Knobler

Moved by an article about the plight of orphans of the AIDS epidemic in Africa, Knobler and his wife adopted a five-year-old boy from Ethiopia. The energetic and free-spirited Nate quickly brought change to the dynamic of their quiet Jewish family that included their biological son and daughter. In this heartwarming memoir, Nobler weaves moving stories such as meeting Nate’s dying mother in Ethiopia with the hilarious tales of Nate’s adjustment to his new life. 

Texts From Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with your favorite literary characters by Mallory Ortberg

In this hilarious take on literary favorites, Mallory Ortberg holds imaginary and hilarious conversations via text message with everyone’s favorite characters and writers. From Achilles to Hamlet, Jessica Wakefield to Hermione Granger, Ortberg perfectly captures them in texts. This is a must read for literature lovers, English majors, and anyone who ever wanted to be best friends with a fictional character. 

Humor ORTBERG, M.

I Stand Corrected: How Teaching Western Manners in China Became Its Own Unforgettable Lesson by Eden Collinsworth

Hired to write a book explaining Western etiquette to the Chinese, long-time businesswoman Collinsworth spent a year living in China, exploring the differences between the cultures and customs of China and the West. I Stand Corrected is a funny and entertaining story of her life in China, her struggle to explain Western customs to her Chinese readers and her explanation of the ways China changed in the past decade.

395 COL 

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

This moving memoir, written in free verse, follows Jacqueline Woodson through her childhood as a young, black girl growing up during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. The use of poetic verse allows Woodson to capture poignant moments in her childhood and share them in a way that really resonates with the reader.  She talks of growing up with her mother, grandparents, and siblings, first in South Carolina and then in New York City.

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