Staff Picks

Walking Home by Eric Walters

Muchoki has been through a lot: Kenyon rioters destroyed his home, his church, and his town. His father died giving Muchoki, his mother and younger sister Jata a chance to escape the turmoil. Now Muchoki, Jata, and his mother are living in a relocation camp. His mother has malaria, so they are waiting for her to become strong enough to travel to her parents’ village. Then the unthinkable happens: his mother dies. Muchoki must figure out a way to get out of the camp, and find his way to his grandparents’ village with his sister.

Autumn Falls by Bella Thorne

Following the death of her father, Autumn, her brother, and her mother move down to Aventura, Florida, to help take care of her grandmother. Fortunately, on her first day of school Autumn becomes friends with a quirky group of kids who take her under their wing, and sparks also fly between her and school quarterback Sean. Unfortunately, at the same time she draws the wrath of one of the most popular girls in school, Reenzie, because Reenzie and Sean have been friends for years. 

Archie Takes Flight by Wendy Mass

It’s Take Your Kid to Work Day, and Archie is finally allowed to tag along with his father.  His dad had the night shift in his yellow taxi.  Instead of picking up customers in the city, Archie discovers that his dad runs a space taxi. Archie is in charge of navigating the taxi from galaxy to galaxy, a skill he inherited from his grandfather.  It seems that stellar navigation is a family gift.  After getting their first fare from HQ, the local bagel shop, Archie and his father enter a new galaxy.

Texts From Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with your favorite literary characters by Mallory Ortberg

In this hilarious take on literary favorites, Mallory Ortberg holds imaginary and hilarious conversations via text message with everyone’s favorite characters and writers. From Achilles to Hamlet, Jessica Wakefield to Hermione Granger, Ortberg perfectly captures them in texts. This is a must read for literature lovers, English majors, and anyone who ever wanted to be best friends with a fictional character. 

Humor ORTBERG, M.

Sorta Like a Rock Star by Matthew Quick

This is the story of Amber Appleton, a relentlessly upbeat 17-year-old who engages daily in a strenuous and not always successful battle in the arena where "hope dukes it out with despair." Despair is wielding some pretty serious weapons, and for a while it seems like it might triumph, as a series of blows challenge Amber’s outlook. The story of how her friends try to bring her back to life is heart-aching and powerful (but not without humor!), and makes a wonderful, fresh and intense reading experience.

Emma and the Blue Genie by Cornelia Caroline Funke

Emma and her dog find a floating bottle, and when she pulls the stopper, Emma releases a small, blue genie named Karim.  Karim can’t grant any wishes because an evil yellow genie stole his powerful nose ring.  Now he’s tiny and powerless.  He asks Emma to help him get back his nose ring and he whisks her off on his magic carpet to a city full of scorpions, turbans, desert sands, a dromedary and the evil genie, Sahim.

The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Ada was born with a clubfoot.  Her single mother is ashamed and keeps her inside their cramped apartment at all times. It’s only when her little brother James starts going to school and exploring the neighborhood that Ada learns what happens beyond her walls. When the children of London are evacuated due to the German bombings during WWII, Ada runs away with her brother.  They are placed with a reluctant guardian, Susan, who is suffering with depression. 

I Stand Corrected: How Teaching Western Manners in China Became Its Own Unforgettable Lesson by Eden Collinsworth

Hired to write a book explaining Western etiquette to the Chinese, long-time businesswoman Collinsworth spent a year living in China, exploring the differences between the cultures and customs of China and the West. I Stand Corrected is a funny and entertaining story of her life in China, her struggle to explain Western customs to her Chinese readers and her explanation of the ways China changed in the past decade.

395 COL 

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Darrow lives a hard life as a Red, the lowest caste in his society. He works as a HellDiver in underground mines hoping to make Mars habitable for future generations. Through a tragic event, Darrow finds out that he is a slave and that Mars has been livable for hundreds of years. He and his people live below the surface of Mars and are slaves to a society ruled by the Golds. With the help from members of an underground rebellion, Darrow sacrifices everything to seek justice for the enslaved Reds. Brutal and violent, Red Rising is like Hunger Games on steroids.

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